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Gelato to go and coffee around the clock

October 7th, 2017

A new generation of ice cream makers are revolutionising the ice cream parlour

Though gelato is ever popular, traditional ice cream parlours are going out of fashion.
More than 90 % of gelato consumed in Germany is now industrially produced and in some cases boosted on the market by major advertising campaigns. Nevertheless, small ice cream parlours, some with only a few varieties, but freshly made from high quality natural ingredients, without colouring, additives or flavourings, are increasing their hold on the market. From 3 to 7 February 2018 the Gelatissimo trade fair in Stuttgart lets you gain a full picture of developments in the artisan ice cream business in recent years. The brand new 15,000 m² Paul Horn Hall (Hall 10) offers more space than ever before for ice cream.
Gelatissimo previews new trends set to change the gelato world – new favourites and original ice cream parlour interior designs. The ice cream parlour itself is in the midst of change, with the latest newcomer business concepts focusing on vintage style and take-aways offering only one ice cream to go and high quality coffee specialities, and enjoying increasing popularity in the process.

Small, but delish – the ice cream take-away

The longer season and rising overheads have resulted in a mushrooming of small ice cream parlours distinguished by artisan quality and creativity. Ice in a wafer or tub, classics like brittle nut sundaes, spaghetti ice cream or amarena cherry sundaes to go are the bestsellers in small ice cream parlours. No terrace with lots of waited-on tables, but an emphasis on cutting costs, smaller premises and self-service. Alongside this purist style, ice cream parlours are becoming increasingly original and the selection more unusual: exotic ice cream varieties, exclusive sorbets and the ice cream parlour’s own creations which depart from the norm. Ice cream lovers are tempted by unique varieties made of natural ingredients and complemented by decorative sauces to create perfectly balanced compositions: ice cream varieties with a savoury flavour, creations inspired by the cake making, exotic versions and fruit sorbets with local fruit are increasingly listed on the menu card. They are the ice cream parlour’s highlights, complementing the standard flavours. Traditional ice-cream sundaes are no longer served at the table either, but sold in stylish transparent bio-degradable containers as take-aways.

Ice cream & coffee: a successful duo

Italian-style coffee, cappuccino or espresso, has always been a standard in classic Italian ice cream parlours. In Germany a modern coffee culture has developed in recent years, resulting in a much wider selection. From latte macchiato or white coffee and American-style filter coffee to the latest trends like cold brew, the classic coffee shop repertoire is now also available in the ice cream parlour. And Italian flair is back in vogue, whether chatting over the counter with the barista, or in a take-away version for people with no time to linger. Against this current backdrop, Messe Stuttgart has set the tone with the “Stuttgart Coffee Summit” which coincides with the Gelatissimo trade fair and is being held for the 4th time already. The programme is packed with workshops, highlights, get-togethers and opportunities for professionals and interested visitors to mingle and exchange ideas. A lot of emphasis is placed on the Coffee Summit motto focusing on the coffee life cycle “from bean to cup”. All processing phases, from sorting and harvesting to roasting and grinding using innovative practical and elegant technology, is presented at the event. In Alfred Kärcher Hall (Hall 8) visitors await an outstanding coffee presentation thanks to the many exhibitors and programme events.

3rd edition of the Grand Prix
Ice cream makers keen to test their skill against the best in their trade in the Gelatissimo ice arena can register for the Grand Prix. This competition involves the preparation of three different ice cream varieties. This year creative interpretations of the following flavours are sought: Day 1 yoghurt, Day 2 raspberry and Day 3 a fantasy flavour. Each winner of the daily competition receives a wonderful Vespa as a prize. On Day 4 the winners compete against each other in a bid to make the best pistachio ice cream. A jury of five experts will track the creative process and then select the best pistachio ice cream. The entire Grand Prix will be broadcast with a live audience. For more details about the Gelatissimo Grand Prix and registration forms go to www.gelatissimo.de/grandprix.

About Gelatissimo:
Gelatissimo, the largest ice cream trade fair north of the Alps, aims to present the world of ice cream culture in all its diversity. Founded in 2008 it takes place every two years and is the German meeting place for artisan ice cream makers. Coinciding with Intergastra – one of the key European hospitality and hotel trade fairs and dedicated host – in 2016 the range of products exhibited in an area covering more than 100,000 square metres attracted around 1,300 exhibitors from home and abroad. And the next chapter of the success story is about to unfold: with the building of the new Paul Horn Hall (Hall 10) and 115,000 square metres at their disposal, as of 2018 the two trade fairs are now offered even more space for innovations and trends. The event therefore meets these high expectations, and regularly receives top marks from the exhibiting companies and specialist visitors alike. Handmade ice cream, coffee, beverages, kitchen technology and food, ambience, equipment and services – these are the themes on which the specialist visitors from Germany and abroad obtain information, and are encouraged to think outside the box. The gastronomic heart of Germany beats in the south-west where at the start of the year Gelatissimo and Intergastra showcase innovations and trends, and provide many opportunities for the exchange of expert opinions and ideas. For more details go to www.gelatissimo.de

 

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What’s the Difference Between Ice Cream & Gelato?

September 23rd, 2017
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Get the scoop on your favorite frozen desserts

 

If you’ve ever found yourself at the ice cream shop or in the freezer section of the supermarket wondering what the difference is between ice cream and gelato, you’re not alone. Though we enjoy all of these treats equally, there are obvious differences between them.

Let’s start with the one we are most familiar with: ice cream. Ice cream is typically made from milk, cream, sugar and sometimes egg yolks. There are many ways to build a base; however, a traditional French custard base consists of tempered egg yolks in milk, cooking the mixture until it develops a thick consistency. According to the Food and Drug Administration, ice cream contains at least 10 percent milk fat and is churned at a high speed to create a light and airy texture.

While gelato is technically the Italian word for “ice cream,” there are differences between the two. A gelato base uses more milk and less cream, and is churned at a much slower speed, resulting in a lower fat content and a creamier texture.

And because we can’t forget about sherbet and sorbet: The middle child stuck between ice cream and sorbet, sherbet is a fruit-based dessert that contains about 1 to 2 percent milk fat. If you’re looking for a dairy-free alternative, sorbet is the dessert to go with. Sometimes used as a palate cleanser between meals, its two main ingredients are fruit juice (or purée) and sugar.

Source:  tastingtable.com

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Unilever introduces raft of ice cream innovations for US market

April 2nd, 2016
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Unilever has rolled out a series of frozen ice cream innovations in the US across five of its best-known ice cream brands, including Klondike, Magnum and Popsicle.

The new products, inspired by “nostalgic favourites”, include a double raspberry edition of Magnum, tropical paradise-flavoured Popsicle ice lollies, and flavour extensions to both Breyers’ ice cream and gelato ranges. For the first time, Breyers has also introduced a line of conveniently pre-portioned snack cups, perfect for a quick treat or fun gathering.

Nick Soukas, director of ice cream for Unilever, said: “At Unilever, we’re on a consistent journey to better understand the connection consumers have to ice cream. We’ve discovered that nostalgia and memorable moments are two reasons consumers enjoy ice cream. With this in mind, we’ve reimagined favorite flavours and pairings that cultivate great memories – like birthday cake, s’mores and chocolate and peanut butter – to surprise and delight our ice cream fans.”

As well as additions to its Klondike, Magnum, Popsicle and Breyers brands, there are also two new products joining Unilever’s Good Humor range of frozen desserts.

In full: Unilever’s new products

  • Breyers ice cream cake, combining Breyers chocolate ice cream with chocolate crunchies, sandwiched between Breyers natural vanilla ice cream.
  • Breyers chocolate peanut butter, featuring Breyers chocolate ice cream with a real peanut butter swirl.
  • Breyers coconut fudge, with real coconut shreds and a fudge swirl for a decadent dessert combination.
  • Breyers chocolate snack cups, bringing together smooth Breyers chocolate ice cream, made with fresh cream and rich Dutch cocoa, in a pre-portioned snack cup.
  • Breyers natural vanilla snack cups, which include Breyers natural vanilla ice cream in a pre-portioned snack cup.
  • Breyers Gelato Indulgences chocolate fudge truffle, which features creamy milk chocolate gelato with a rich fudge swirl and gourmet chocolate truffles.
  • Breyers Gelato Indulgences chocolate hazelnut, combining chocolate gelato with hazelnut flavour, a luscious chocolate hazelnut sauce and gourmet chocolate curls.
  • Breyers Gelato Indulgences peanut butter chocolate, blending creamy peanut butter gelato with a milk chocolate swirl and gourmet chocolate peanut butter cups.
  • Breyers Gelato Indulgences salted caramel truffle, with salted caramel gelato,  a creamy caramel sauce and gourmet salted caramel truffles.
  • Good Humor Oreo Cone, with its chocolate wafer cone, filled with frozen cookies and cream dessert and topped with real Oreo pieces.
  • Good Humor double chocolate chip cookie sandwich, with frozen chocolate-flavoured dessert coated in chocolate chips and sandwiched between two chocolate chip cookies.
  • Klondike S’Mores, featuring creamy marshmallow ice cream laden with sweet graham cracker swirls inside a breakable milk chocolate shell.
  • Magnum Double Raspberry, featuring refreshing raspberry ice cream, raspberry sauce and a crackling coating made with rich Belgian chocolate.
  • Magnum Double Chocolate vanilla, offering a balance of silky vanilla bean ice cream, decadent chocolate sauce and a crackling chocolate coating.
  • Popsicle tropical paradise, available in mango, strawberry-banana, island punch, and pineapple flavours.
  • Popsicle sugar-free red classics, providing a better-for-you treat in all red flavours including cherry, raspberry and strawberry.
  • Popsicle Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, complete with Michelangelo, Donatello, Raphael and Leonardo in four flavours.

Source:  foodbev.com

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Watch ice cream that changes COLOUR in your hand thanks to inventor’s new secret recipe

July 25th, 2014
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ice_cream_xamaleonThe Spanish physicist created the sweet treat named Xamaleon but he’s keeping quiet over how he came up with his creation

An ice cream which changes colour as it slowly melts has been invented by a physicist who became a professional cook.

Manuel Linares took a course in ice cream making which included encouraging students to make a new flavour.

When he told the course tutor at the Hotel Business School Hoffman in Barcelona he wanted to make one that changed colour, he was laughed at.

But the 37-year-old Spaniard studied physics and engineering at university before deciding to become a cook, and has created the new ice cream, called “Xamaleon”, meaning “chameleon”.

The ice cream supposedly turns from blue to purple as it starts to melt.

He is staying tight lipped over the secret behind how the colour change works in his recipe.

He said: “As a physicist I know that there are various possibilities that might work and I was delighted when I managed to crack it and create an ice cream that changes colour.”

The ice cream he created, which he says tastes like tutti-frutti, includes strawberries, cocoa, almonds, banana, pistachio, vanilla and caramel, and is so popular that business at his ice cream parlour in the town of Calella de Mar, in the east Spanish province of Barcelona, is booming.

He is hoping to find buyers to sell the ice cream abroad.

He said: “I am a huge fan of the British ice cream genius Charlie Francis, the creator of a fluorescent ice and founder of the company Lick Me Delicious and I wanted to create an ice cream that changed colour to try and do something new as well.

“It was important to me to make sure I only used natural ingredients, so it took a bit longer. And as to the trick, I am not giving out too much detail because the patents are still going through.”

Source:  DailyMirror
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Viagra Ice Cream

May 10th, 2014
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helado-viagraBristol company Lick Me I’m Delicious behind Viagra ice cream created for mystery celebrity

We’ve all heard rumours about what goes on behind closed doors at celebrity parties. But now a Bristol ice cream company has got people guessing which celebrity could be behind the next big scandal.
Lick Me I’m Delicious revealed this week it has created a Viagra ice cream for an A-list client at a top secret gathering.
Dubbed ‘The Arousal’ each ball (of ice cream) contained a 25mg Viagra dose and was flavoured with bubbly champagne.

The company, which specialises in creating unusual flavours and presentations of ice cream, has sworn to keep a lid on its latest invention. In a tight-lipped interview with the Bristol Post, company founder Charlie Harry said: “All we can say is a person approached us asking if we could make this flavour. “We suggested we would go public to raise our own profile but the client was very reluctant. They just about agreed in the end for us to keep them anonymous.”
Charlie said he had to sign strict confidentiality agreements with the customers before being invited to the top secret party with his custom-made portable ice cream parlour. He said: “It’s top secret. There is an agreement which cannot be broken. “I can reveal everyone at the party liked it, there was a great reaction. It’s all very secretive. All I’m allowed to say is it was for a party and that they were very happy with the end result. “They were all very nice but we can’t legally say who they were.”

Asked if he was tempted to try the new flavour, he said: “No, I was a bit terrified to be honest. I have never taken something like that but I am aware of its effects.” He agreed it was not ideal for a professional work environment. He added he was also unable to try the ice cream as it contained a prescription-only drug. Charlie’s experimental ice cream company has made thousands of flavours of ice cream including beer, fish and chips, roast beef and gold leaf.
Last year they made the world’s first glow in the dark ice cream using Jellyfish luminescence. They are currently working on creating the world’s first flammable ice cream and the world’s first invisible ice cream.

Source: Bristol Post

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Move Over, Dippin’ Dots: 5 Futuristic Ice Creams

August 2nd, 2013
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When Dippin’ Dots emerged in 1987 with the slogan “Ice Cream of the Future,” its liquid nitrogen-blasted pellets seemed about as cutting edge as ice cream could get.

But ice cream has come a long way since then. Now, ice cream revolutionaries are updating our notions of ice cream texture and flavor with bioengineering and sheer chutzpah. Welcome to the new future of ice cream.

Lunar Ice Cream

Haagen-Dazs’ Ice Moon spherical delights were created for the 2012 Christmas season by design team Doshi Levien. And if they’re any indication, the moon fares much better in ice cream than in cheese. The Full Ice Moon cake consisted of macadamia nut brittle ice cream and raspberry sorbet, separated by meringue and positioned on a pistachio biscuit base. The Harvest Ice Moon treat, meanwhile, featured salted caramel and vanilla ice cream with salted caramel sauce and crispy chocolate as a base. What looks like a rough, cratered mini-moon may be a small step for ice cream, but it’s one that could become a giant leap for ice cream cakes. For their limited release, the cakes cost $58, and were available only at Haagen-Dazs shops throughout France, Belgium, Amsterdam and London.

Wikipearls

Wikipearls look like big doughnut holes, but they have ice cream on the inside. Inspired by grape skins, Harvard bioengineering professor David Edwards set out to find ways to serve food in edible casings that would eliminate plastic packaging. When he applied his Wikicell technology to ice cream, the result was Wikipearls: Ice cream balls wrapped in a delectable skin. Wikipearls currently come in three flavors: mango with a coconut skin, chocolate with a hazelnut skin, and vanilla with a peanut skin. Right now, Wikipearls are only available for purchase at the small Wikibar shop in the heart of Paris. But they’ll be making their first appearance in the U.S. later this year, Edwards says.

One Bite, Two Flavors

Why should there be one flavor of ice cream per bite when there could be two? “Flavor release” ice cream was developed by Elizabeth Fenner in 2011 when she was a graduate student at the University of Missouri. Fenner used micro-encapsulation technology — coating the flavor compounds with a tiny dissolvable polymer — to make an ice cream that starts as vanilla and then about four seconds later turns to cherry. This ice cream isn’t commercially available yet, but Fenner has said she wants to try to refine the idea. Fenner is now a product development specialist at Yogurtland, so we can only hope there will be a frozen yogurt variation on the way.

Liquid Nitrogen To Order

It only takes a minute for a milky mixture to meld into ice cream beneath a cloud of frigid nitrogen “smoke.” Liquid nitrogen ice cream technology can quickly freeze an ice cream base with any add-ins, turning a liquid into a solid as if by magic. Parlors that specialize in this quick-freeze ice cream made to order have been sprouting up across the U.S. — from Smitten in San Francisco, which the Salt profiled in April, to the Sub Zero Ice Cream chain, which has 27 store locations nationwide from Washington to Florida. The new texture of this ice cream — denser, harder, richer — and freshness make it an intriguing twist on traditional frozen treats.

All The Food Groups In One Cone?

Ice cream need not be limited to sweet flavors, we’re learning. The “ice cream without limits” approach is the philosophy of Humphry Slocombe in San Francisco. Owners Jake Godby and Sean Vahey pride themselves in — and are famous for — their outside-the-box ice cream flavors that utilize raw ingredients like meats, cheeses, nuts and vegetables. Get a load of some recent picks: sweet summer corn, strawberry black olive, even foie gras and boccalone prosciutto. Here’s to hoping that in the future Humphry Slocombe will prove that we can eat only ice cream and still hit all the major food groups.

Source: Capital Public Radio

When Dippin’ Dots emerged in 1987 with the slogan “Ice Cream of the Future,” its liquid nitrogen-blasted pellets seemed about as cutting edge as ice cream could get.

But ice cream has come a long way since then. Now, ice cream revolutionaries are updating our notions of ice cream texture and flavor with bioengineering and sheer chutzpah. Welcome to the new future of ice cream.

Lunar Ice Cream

Haagen-Dazs’ Ice Moon spherical delights were created for the 2012 Christmas season by design team Doshi Levien. And if they’re any indication, the moon fares much better in ice cream than in cheese. The Full Ice Moon cake consisted of macadamia nut brittle ice cream and raspberry sorbet, separated by meringue and positioned on a pistachio biscuit base. The Harvest Ice Moon treat, meanwhile, featured salted caramel and vanilla ice cream with salted caramel sauce and crispy chocolate as a base. What looks like a rough, cratered mini-moon may be a small step for ice cream, but it’s one that could become a giant leap for ice cream cakes. For their limited release, the cakes cost $58, and were available only at Haagen-Dazs shops throughout France, Belgium, Amsterdam and London.

Wikipearls

Wikipearls look like big doughnut holes, but they have ice cream on the inside. Inspired by grape skins, Harvard bioengineering professor David Edwards set out to find ways to serve food in edible casings that would eliminate plastic packaging. When he applied his Wikicell technology to ice cream, the result was Wikipearls: Ice cream balls wrapped in a delectable skin. Wikipearls currently come in three flavors: mango with a coconut skin, chocolate with a hazelnut skin, and vanilla with a peanut skin. Right now, Wikipearls are only available for purchase at the small Wikibar shop in the heart of Paris. But they’ll be making their first appearance in the U.S. later this year, Edwards says.

One Bite, Two Flavors

Why should there be one flavor of ice cream per bite when there could be two? “Flavor release” ice cream was developed by Elizabeth Fenner in 2011 when she was a graduate student at the University of Missouri. Fenner used micro-encapsulation technology — coating the flavor compounds with a tiny dissolvable polymer — to make an ice cream that starts as vanilla and then about four seconds later turns to cherry. This ice cream isn’t commercially available yet, but Fenner has said she wants to try to refine the idea. Fenner is now a product development specialist at Yogurtland, so we can only hope there will be a frozen yogurt variation on the way.

Liquid Nitrogen To Order

It only takes a minute for a milky mixture to meld into ice cream beneath a cloud of frigid nitrogen “smoke.” Liquid nitrogen ice cream technology can quickly freeze an ice cream base with any add-ins, turning a liquid into a solid as if by magic. Parlors that specialize in this quick-freeze ice cream made to order have been sprouting up across the U.S. — from Smitten in San Francisco, which the Salt profiled in April, to the Sub Zero Ice Cream chain, which has 27 store locations nationwide from Washington to Florida. The new texture of this ice cream — denser, harder, richer — and freshness make it an intriguing twist on traditional frozen treats.

All The Food Groups In One Cone?

Ice cream need not be limited to sweet flavors, we’re learning. The “ice cream without limits” approach is the philosophy of Humphry Slocombe in San Francisco. Owners Jake Godby and Sean Vahey pride themselves in — and are famous for — their outside-the-box ice cream flavors that utilize raw ingredients like meats, cheeses, nuts and vegetables. Get a load of some recent picks: sweet summer corn, strawberry black olive, even foie gras and boccalone prosciutto. Here’s to hoping that in the future Humphry Slocombe will prove that we can eat only ice cream and still hit all the major food groups.

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Nestlé opens first Mövenpick ice cream boutique in Russia

November 23rd, 2012
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Ice cream lovers in Russia can indulge their passion at a new restaurant that includes their favourite frozen treat in every starter, main course and dessert on the menu.

Nestlé’s first-ever Mövenpick ice creamboutique in the country offers unusual culinary creations such as mushroom cream soup with maple walnut ice cream, truffle oil and mushroom chips, and a salad of fresh and caramelised pear, goat’s cheese, pear sorbet and mix of greens with south-east Asian seasoning.

A variety of other salads, soups and hot meals are available alongside desserts, milkshakes, smoothies and cocktails at the boutique in Moscow.

Consumers can enjoy more than 30 different flavours of Mövenpick ice creams and sorbets including ‘Swiss chocolate’, ‘pistachio’ and ‘strawberry and raspberry’, to be eaten inside or taken away.

“Through our boutiques, we can show people how ice cream can not only be enjoyed on its own as a dessert, but also as the starting point for many different recipes,” says Andrea Zambelli, chief executive officer of Mövenpick ice cream.

Mövenpick ice cream was originally produced in Switzerland in the 1960s for fine-dining restaurants, so it has a very strong gastronomic heritage.

“The attention to detail we put into creating each flavour, and the lengths we go to source exactly the right natural ingredients from across the globe, reflect our Swiss roots and reputation for quality and perfection.”

Russia is the Mövenpick ice cream brand’s second biggest market worldwide after Switzerland.

“Consumers in Russia are particularly fond of creamy, whipped ice cream with pieces of chocolate or nuts,” says Zambelli.

“We are offering people the opportunity to try new flavours of ice cream while enjoying an experience of eating it they can’t have anywhere else.”

The boutique in Moscow is the only place in Russia where consumers can try certain Mövenpick ice cream flavours that are not available to buy from retailers.

“We have dedicated ranges of ice cream for retailers and for restaurants,” Zambelli explains.

“Chefs often prefer to work with simpler flavours they can add other tastes to, while consumers generally like to buy more complex combinations.

“Visitors to the boutique can sample both. There will also be opportunities for them to watch how the chef assembles different dishes,” she added.

Nestlé opened its first Mövenpick ice cream boutique in Zurich in Switzerland in 2004. It now has two more in the country, in Lausanne and Geneva.

The company has several boutiques in Australia and in a variety of other countries worldwide.

Nestlé acquired the Mövenpick ice cream brand in 2003.

It is now sold in more than 30 countries worldwide including China, Egypt, Finland, France, Singapore, Switzerland, Thailand and the United Kingdom.

Mövenpick’s ‘Maître Glaciers’, a team of ice cream experts based at the brand’s research centre in Switzerland, are responsible for inventing each new flavour.

In recent years, these have included Asian black leaf lychee and rose, Provence lavender honey and violet, white chocolate and Tasmanian pepper, and double cream and meringues.

Source: Sweets & Snacks Europe

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