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DSM gets approval for gluten break down enzyme

August 12th, 2017
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DSM has secured regulatory approval to market what it says is the first and only enzyme demonstrated to effectively break down residual gluten in the European Union. Tolerase G – or Aspergillus Niger prolyl oligopeptidase – is now permitted for use in food supplements by the European Commission, following EFSA’s positive opinion on DSM’s novel food dossier.

Found in wheat, barley and rye, gluten is a protein complex that is rich in an amino acid called proline. The human body cannot break down proline-rich proteins efficiently and this may be why some people are sensitive to dietary gluten. In the UK, for example, a recent report suggests that 13% of the population consider themselves to be non-celiac gluten sensitive. However, with gluten ‘hidden’ in a surprisingly wide range of foods, maintaining a gluten-free diet can be difficult when eating away from home.

Tolerase G is aimed at gluten-sensitive consumers who follow a gluten-free diet or avoid eating gluten, but want help in breaking down residual gluten in the stomach. Studies have shown that Tolerase G degrades gluten molecules more effectively than other commercially available supplements.

“Gluten-free diets are becoming increasingly common, with many Europeans taking steps to reduce the adverse symptoms they experience after consuming such foods. However, it can be very difficult to avoid eating gluten altogether – especially when travelling or attending social events,” said Adrian Meyer, Marketing Manager Human Nutrition and Health, DSM. “Tolerase G offers manufacturers the opportunity to create unique food supplement products that significantly improve the lives of gluten sensitive consumers – giving this growing number of individuals the freedom to enjoy eating out, without the possible discomfort of residual gluten.”

Source: Ingredients Network

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DuPont to Offer Three Newly Approved Food Enzymes in Japan

July 8th, 2017
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DuPont™ Danisco® enzymes will drive the standard of bakery specialties to the next level.

In June, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare granted DuPont approval for three bakery enzymes to be used as processing aids in Japan. The enzymes first debuted at the MOBAC Show at Osaka in February earlier this year, in anticipation of a regulatory nod. With this recent new approval, bakers and flour millers can now include POWERFresh® and POWERSoft® range of enzymes to maintain superior fresh-eating quality, improve softness and moistness in their bakery applications.

Bakery enzymes for the finest bake

Whether it is frozen dough or freshly baked ready-to-eats, the advantages for manufacturers is obvious – consistent quality with excellent bite, crumb and texture. Based on proprietary G4 amylase technology, the unique POWERFresh® and POWERSoft® enzymes with anti-staling properties are proven to improve and maintain bakery freshness throughout shelf-life with better cost-in-use advantage.

The POWERFresh® range maintains softness and delivers extra resilience in breads. POWERFresh® 3150 is a customized blend suitable for soft rolls, while POWERFresh® 4150 is specially tailored for sandwich breads. In sweet baked goods, POWERSoft® 7033 promises a luxurious eating sensation and delivers superior moistness and softness in pound and sponge cakes.

Unrivalled performance

“The Asia food landscape is changing, consumers with improving spending power are constantly pressuring manufacturers to improve and expect the highest product quality. Foods and beverages not only need to look good, they must also taste good.” says Lee Lai See, regional business director, Food Enzymes, ASPAC.

“The performance results of these new solutions are promising and will help manufacturers develop fresh and differentiated products to address the demands for premium quality bake in Japan.” she adds.

The new range of bakery solutions will be introduced at the Japan Institute of Bakery technical seminar on June 27 in Tokyo. Dr. Karsten M. Kragh, senior staff scientist who has led in the development of G4-amylase will share the story behind this successful advancement.

Source: Dupont

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Mühlenchemie introduces two new enzymes to lower falling number of flours

March 19th, 2016
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Germany-based Mühlenchemie has developed two enzyme systems, Deltamalt FN-A and FN-B, to reduce the falling number of flours.

The two enzyme systems are also capable of improving the baking performance of flours.

Previous mills had to mix different preparations to improve the number of flours, which now can be achieved by adding a single one enzyme system.

The falling number of flour is considered by bakers and millers to be the perfect parameter to measure the flour’s natural enzymatic activity and quality.

The instability in wheat quality will increase with time due to arrange of factors that include change in climatic conditions, increasing demand for food in general and political and economical instability.

Millers find it more and more difficult to treat flours in a way such that they can meet the demand of the consumers in terms of quality and cost.

Two new enzyme systems developed by the German flour mill are based on a fungal amylase (Deltamalt FN-A) or a combination of enzymes naturally present in grain with fungal amylase (Deltamalt FN-B), which can control the falling number, as well as increase the baking performance of flour.

Source: Asia Food Journal

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DSM Launches Enzyme to Effectively Help Digest Residual Gluten

July 25th, 2015
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DSM claims to have launched the first and the only digestive enzyme demonstrated to effectively break down residual gluten in the stomach to the US dietary supplement market. Tolerase G – or Aspergillus Niger prolyl endoprotease (AN-PEP) – is ideal for the rising number of gluten sensitive consumers following a gluten-free diet who want help digesting hidden or residual gluten that may be found in a broad range of foods.

The results of a new in-vitro study published in the peer-reviewed journal, PlosONE, show that the AN-PEP digestive enzyme degrades gluten molecules in the stomach more effectively than other commercially available supplements.

Gluten is present naturally in certain grains, and may often be found in processed foods. It is difficult for consumers looking for gluten free diet because gluten free products may not always be at hand during social events or traveling. Gluten sensitive consumers following a gluten-free diet could benefit from using Tolerase G. This product, however, is not intended for individuals with celiac disease or who are gluten intolerant. For individuals with gluten intolerance, a lifelong gluten free diet is the only available treatment.

The first paper on the gluten-degrading effect of the AN-PEP enzyme was published earlier this year in Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study concluded that AN-PEP enhanced gluten digestion of healthy volunteers within a one hour period, irrespective of the caloric content of the meal.

“A growing number of people now opt to follow a gluten-free diet, but until recently it was difficult for dietary supplement manufacturers to match consumer demand as the available digestive enzymes were not effective in degrading gluten in the stomach,” comments Thierry Garrier, Marketing Director at DSM. “Tolerase G is the result of significant research, carried out over a number of years, to show the efficacy and safety of the enzyme. The new science gives manufacturers the evidence they need to educate consumers on the benefits offered by this unique ingredient.”

Aparna Parikh at DSM Nutritional Products confirmed to FoodIngredientsFirst that the most relevant application for Tolerase G is supplements and at this point the company is not looking to put this product in F&B products. “At this point we only have regulatory approval for the US but additional filings for regulatory approvals are possible and/or underway,” she noted.

Source: Food Ingredients First

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Sunwin Stevia now producing enzyme treated products

May 10th, 2014
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steviaSunwin Stevia International, a provider of stevia extracts including Rebaudioside A 98 and Rebaudioside 99, has announced that its facilities are now producing enzyme treated stevia products and the company has received an initial purchase order for 3,500 kilograms from a U.S. based company.

According to the company, enzyme treated stevia is one of the most advanced types of steviosides produced in the world for use in the food and beverage industries. While stevia has been growing in popularity in recent years as an all natural sweetener, its applications have been limited in part because it often exhibits a bitter, licorice-like aftertaste, the company said. Enzyme treated stevia is produced by the addition of glucose to stevia extracts using a-glucosyltransferase. This new method can effectively decrease or even eliminate the bitter aftertaste of natural stevia, Sunwin Stevia claims.

“We are excited to add enzyme treated stevia to our commercial product offerings making Sunwin Stevia one of a select few suppliers capable of producing this extract on a large scale basis,” said Dongdong Lin, CEO of Sunwin Stevia. “We believe our technology is state of the art and enzyme treated stevia has the potential to vastly expand the market in the years to come. We look forward to actively marketing our enzyme treated stevia in Europe and North America and expanding our sales in this important new product category.”

Source: Ingredients network

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Malt flour alternative could improve drought hit flour

June 4th, 2011
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A new enzyme concentrate can improve the baking properties of wheat and rye flours for bread makers and tackles the challenges of too high intrinsic enzyme activity linked to very dry growing conditions, said Mühlenchemie.

This development will be good news for the bakery sector as an unusually dry and hot spring in top EU wheat producers and severe dryness in US wheat growing states has resulted in irreversible drought damage in the crops.

Heat damage to wheat causes high ‘falling numbers’ but enzymes can be added by mills in various ways to standardize their flours and enhance their quality when baked.

Widened amylase range

The German flour improver specialists said its new purified cereal based Betamalt 25 FBD is an extension of its amylases range.

Amylases, in a multi-stage reaction process, break up the unbranched sections of the starch molecule into shorter units and provide the yeast with enough sugar for fermentation.

In the case of low-enzyme flours the viscosity of the dough can be reduced in this way, and this in turn improves the processing characteristics of the dough and the properties of the baked products, note Mühlenchemie.

Dr Lutz Popper, head of research & development at the German supplier, told this publication that Betamalt 25 FBD is cost effective in that it can be added at a dosage rate five to ten times lower than the industry standard, malt flour.

The new processing aid “proved its superiority over added wheat malt flour or fungal ?-amylase in both low-enzyme German wheat flour and North American hard wheat flour,” said the supplier

“Depending on the starting material and the desired Falling Number reduction, 10 to 50 g per 100 kg of flour is usually enough to improve oven rise, volume, shelf-life and browning of the baked goods”, said Popper.

The company said that tests with low-enzyme rye flour, Type 997, from the German harvest produced similar results, saying the addition of 50 g Betamalt 25 FBD per 100 kg of flour lowered the Falling Number by 100 s.

Analyses in the Amylograph confirmed that the new enzyme concentrate reduced the maximum viscosity by about 400 AU and the maximum pasting temperature by about 15°C, added the supplier.

Source: Bakery and Snacks

new enzyme concentrate can improve the baking properties of wheat and rye flours for bread makers and tackles the challenges of too high intrinsic enzyme activity linked to very dry growing conditions, said Mühlenchemie.

This development will be good news for the bakery sector as an unusually dry and hot spring in top EU wheat producers and severe dryness in US wheat growing states has resulted in irreversible drought damage in the crops.

Heat damage to wheat causes high ‘falling numbers’ but enzymes can be added by mills in various ways to standardize their flours and enhance their quality when baked.

Widened amylase range

The German flour improver specialists said its new purified cereal based Betamalt 25 FBD is an extension of its amylases range.

Amylases, in a multi-stage reaction process, break up the unbranched sections of the starch molecule into shorter units and provide the yeast with enough sugar for fermentation.

In the case of low-enzyme flours the viscosity of the dough can be reduced in this way, and this in turn improves the processing characteristics of the dough and the properties of the baked products, note Mühlenchemie.

Dr Lutz Popper, head of research & development at the German supplier, told this publication that Betamalt 25 FBD is cost effective in that it can be added at a dosage rate five to ten times lower than the industry standard, malt flour.

The new processing aid “proved its superiority over added wheat malt flour or fungal ?-amylase in both low-enzyme German wheat flour and North American hard wheat flour,” said the supplier

“Depending on the starting material and the desired Falling Number reduction, 10 to 50 g per 100 kg of flour is usually enough to improve oven rise, volume, shelf-life and browning of the baked goods”, said Popper.

The company said that tests with low-enzyme rye flour, Type 997, from the German harvest produced similar results, saying the addition of 50 g Betamalt 25 FBD per 100 kg of flour lowered the Falling Number by 100 s.

Analyses in the Amylograph confirmed that the new enzyme concentrate reduced the maximum viscosity by about 400 AU and the maximum pasting temperature by about 15°C, added the supplier.

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Enzymes may boost chocolate flavour: Study

May 20th, 2011
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Enzymatic treatment of cocoa almonds may improve flavour profiles by up to 50 per cent, leading to improved chocolate flavours from low quality almonds, according to new research.

The study, published in the Journal of Food Science, outlines a method for an enzymatic treatment for poor-quality cocoa almonds (known as slate), which may result in a better chocolate flavour.

“This result is very encouraging because it indicates that microbial enzymes, which are cheaper and more readily available than animal enzymes, can be used to enhance chocolate flavour,” said the authors, led by Hilana Salete Silva Oliveira from State University of Feira de Santana (UEFS), Brazil.

They added that further optimisation of the enzyme treatment is necessary “to obtain better results and thus establish a process that can be used for industrial purposes for manufacturing cocoa and chocolate.”

 

Cocoa flavour

Cocoa almonds are the raw material used in the production of chocolate. They are fermented and dried seeds of cocoa fruits.

The authors noted that the commercial value of cocoa is based not only on the melting characteristics of its fat, which melts in very narrow range that is close to body temperature and provides a unique mouth-feel, but also on the chocolate flavour, “which is developed in properly processed seeds.”

They noted that fresh beans, extracted from the ripe cocoa fruit, have no chocolate flavour and are in fact “extremely bitter and astringent.”

“For the desired flavour to develop, the seeds must go through a curing process that involves a stage of fermentation and drying, which leads to the formation of flavour precursors,” explained Oliveira and her colleagues.

However, they said that a “recurring problem” in the chocolate industry is the poor quality of the some almonds, which leads to reduced fermentation and poor flavour formation.

“Because the fermentation and drying processes still take place on farms, without any controlled condition, a significant percentage of cocoa almonds from each batch do not undergo the necessary changes (acidification and temperature increase) for the necessary enzymatic reactions to occur,” said the researchers.

“As a result, a significant portion of the roasted almonds do not develop the characteristic chocolate flavour, which reduces the quality of the chocolate produced,” they added.

Oliveira and co-workers said that one possibility to remedy this problem is the use of commercial enzymes with similar activity patterns to help in the fermentation process.

“These enzymes should hydrolyze proteins present in the almonds, releasing the flavour precursors that were not produced during the fermentation period … Thus, it would be possible to standardize the quality of cocoa produced, ensuring the quality of the chocolate,” said the authors.

Study details

The researchers tested three commercial enzymes for their ability to improve the flavour attributes of cocoa slate. The team tested swine pepsin, carboxypeptidase A (purchased from the Sigma-Aldrich), and Flavorzyme (Novozymes), against enzymes extracted from unfermented cocoa beans (vegetable enzyme).

The enzymatic treatments were evaluated by chemical analysis (hydrolysis efficiency), and sensory analysis of the treated material compared to good-quality cocoa almonds.

The researchers reported that almonds treated with microbial enzymes (Flavorzyme) developed better chocolate flavour. They added that Flavorzyme, which contains aspartic proteases and carboxypeptidases of microbial origin, provided an improvement of 50 per cent in relation to the chocolate flavour.

“Although the hydrolysis achieved was similar for all tested enzymes … microbial enzymes were able to produce more of the desired precursors that, after roasting, lead to the formation of the chocolate flavour,” said the authors.

“These results indicate that it is possible to use microbial enzymes to improve the quality of cocoa almonds, which is advantageous because microbial enzymes are low in cost and can be supplied in significant quantities, making them more viable for industrial applications,” concluded Oliveira and colleagues.

Source: Journal of Food Science

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Enzyme based fat replacer can reduces fat in bread by 70 per cent, claims Puratos

March 4th, 2011
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An enzyme based margarine, butter and oil alternative for bakery goods can reduce the level of saturated and total fat in bread by up to 70 per cent, according to ingredients supplier Puratos.

 

Puraslim is a “functional paste” that the company claims can allow for nutritional claims such as ‘low in fat’, ‘zero grams trans fat per serving’ and ‘reduced fat’ in rolls, pan bread, tortilla, buns.

 

The fat in cakes and muffins can be reduced by up to 50 per cent, said Puratos, which also allows for a ‘reduced fat’ claim.

 

Although the cost of Puraslim within the recipe is comparable to margarines and shortening, it is used at lower dosage levels, which makes it more cost effective, according to Puratos.

 

“Puraslim is also less price volatile than oils, ensuring a more stable price point,” said the company.

 

Taste

 

Despite the drop in fat content, the company claims that taste and texture of the goods is not lost as the ingredient mimics all the functionalities of traditional fats such as texture and shelf life.

 

“The enzyme and emulsifier technology present in Puraslim brings out a comparable or even improved texture as traditional fats do in soft baked goods, such as softness, freshness and shortbite,” Amber Goossens, brand manager at Puratos told.

 

“To compensate for the typical mouth feel and flavour release that a fat brings in sweet baked goods, a carefully selected touch of flavour has been added,” said Goossens.

 

According to Goossens, blind consumer tests run by Puratos Sensobus showed that 44 per cent of the consumers preferred the Puraslim version of brioche breads to the standard bread of with 31 per cent preferred. 25 per cent of the consumers had no preference at all.

 

When consumers received information about the fat reduction, the preference was increased to 66 per cent, claims Goossens.

 

The ingredient is available in both the US and Europe.

 

Source: Bakery and Snacks

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Bread enzyme gives softness, better sliceability and longer shelf life, says DSM

December 10th, 2010
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An extension of the Panamore enzyme blend product range improves the freshness of breads and is particularly suited to low sugar and low fat recipes, claims developer DSM Food Specialties.

The ingredient supplier maintains that today’s consumers shop less frequently than ever before, stimulating demand for bread that has extended shelf life, with softness a key factor in breads’ perceived freshness.

Rossana Rodriguez, product manager baking enzymes at DSM Food Specialties told  that Panamore Soft, its new bread orientated enzyme, works extremely well in lean bread recipes and is particularly well suited to reduced sugar and fat formulations, as these bread varieties stale very quickly.

“Panamore Soft will therefore have the biggest impact in these types of applications,” she claims, adding that it delivers uniform results in all types of flour regardless of bread variety or processing method.

Containing a patent protected blend of enzymes, she said that DSM has harnessed its experience in the fields of amylases and lipolitic enzymes to produce a product that is “one step ahead of current options on the market”.

In tests, the composition of Panamore Soft produced enhanced initial softness, better sliceability and longer shelf life over time than maltogenic amylase, continued the supplier.

The ingredient, said Rodriguez, contains a starch degrading enzyme combined with lipolitic activity, which reduces the rate of amylopectine crystallisation whilst also keeping the gluten in the rubber state.

“This ensures that the bread crumb remains flexible and the desired level of resilience is achieved, resulting in a softer crumb and prolonged freshness,” added the product manager.

Rodriguez said the inclusion rate per unit is very much dependent on the application. “Positioned as a solution for softness that lasts, Panamore Soft is suited to all applications where extended shelf life is required, such as soft rolls and crumb rich breads, for example sandwich and tin loaves.”

Source: Bakery and Snacks

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Could snake and spider enzymes be used as food ingredients?

March 19th, 2010
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Enzymes derived from snakes, spiders and carnivorous plants may soon be used as food ingredients.

The Danish Council for Strategic Research is looking into their potential to be used in everyday products such as food and laundry detergents.

Among the companies taking part in the research is Danisco, a world leader in food ingredients enzymes and bio-based solutions.

Charlotte Poulsen, an enzyme development specialist at the firm Danisco said the research would centre around the “highly effective” digestive qualities of enzymes such as the kind a spider injects into its prey to liquefy it.

The commercial possibilities are endless, Ms Poulsen noted.

She explained: “The highly potent enzymes may be used in for instance food ingredients, detergents, animal nutrition and a long list of other applications in which enzymes can perform their function as process catalysts.”

The research project has already begun and will run for a period of four years.

Source:  Ingredients Network

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