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Castronovo Chocolate wins at International Chocolate Awards

November 11th, 2017
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Castronovo Chocolate’s Signature Collection Nicalizo, Nicaragua 70% has won a bronze award in the Micro-batch – Plain/Origin Dark Chocolate Bars category at the World Finals from the International Chocolate Awards.

The winners, selected from more than 800 entries, were announced Oct. 14 in London.

This is the third award for the Nicalizo bar.

Earlier this year, the bar was awarded Silver in the International Chocolate Award Americas & Asia Pacific Semifinals (single-origin micro batch dark chocolate), and Silver the Academy of Chocolate Awards (London) Dark Bean to Bar under 80% category.

It is the 44th award overall for Castronovo Chocolate, who launched its business in 2013.

The Nicalizo bar was introduced to Castronovo’s Signature Collection – a thoughtfully curated assortment of the company’s finest chocolate – this year.

For its Signature Collection, Castronovo searches the world over for cocoa beans with extraordinary flavor.

Recent discoveries have found Criollo varieties of cacao with origins in Nicaragua, a country that is quickly becoming a hotbed for the world’s finest-flavored cacao.

Castronovo chose the Nicalizo heirloom cacao, which is certified heirloom by the Heirloom Cacao Preservation Fund (HCP) for their chocolate because of the complex flavor of plum and cherry fruits along with rich buttery notes of toasted toffee with a little pink peppercorn spice and a long-lasting finish of roasted walnut.

The Nicalizo, Nicaragua 70% bar ($14) is available online at www.castronovochocolate.com, and at select chocolate boutiques throughout the US.

Castronovo Chocolate makes exquisite bean-to-bar chocolate using heirloom beans from remote locations throughout the world. However, the company’s mission extends far beyond organic, award-winning chocolate.

Castronovo Chocolate is passionate about protecting heirloom varieties of cacao, enabling rainforest conservation, promoting peace in post-conflict regions and allowing cocoa to provide a commercial venture for indigenous people in remote villages.

Each chocolate bar has its own unique story that positively reflects its area of origin, impacts on biodiversity and protection of indigenous people’s culture.

Castronovo Chocolate is in relentless pursuit of discovering the absolute depths of the chocolate experience knowing full well they may never get there.

However, along the way, Castronovo Chocolate takes solace in knowing that they are providing a delicious chocolate product for all to enjoy.

Source:  tcpalm.com

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How flawed science helped turn chocolate into a health food

November 11th, 2017
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A small and preliminary study was hyped to claim that chocolate fights Alzheimer’s.

Have you heard? Dark chocolate will do everything from boost your cognition to reduce your cardiovascular disease risk and even help you lose weight! Or so the chocolate science hype machine will tell you.

Several months ago, we got to wondering how chocolate candy had earned such a powerful health halo. So we dove into the science behind these claims about chocolate and cocoa to find out more.

In an original Vox analysis, we discovered that food companies like Nestlé, Mars, Barry Callebaut, and Hershey’s — among the world’s biggest producers of chocolate — have poured millions of dollars into scientific studies and research grants that support cocoa science. Of the 100 Mars-sponsored studies on cocoa, chocolate, and health, 98 had conclusions that were favorable to the candy maker in some way.

That’s an uncannily high number. And it raises questions about the quality of the studies, given that Mars and other chocolate makers can use the positive findings to market their products. Industry-sponsored studies are more likely than independent research to yield conclusions that favor the funder’s products.

In our review of the research, we found studies that were well-designed, well-executed, and that produced seemingly reliable results. (This was particularly true for the science on cocoa’s effects on blood pressure.) But some of the other claims don’t stand up as well when you look closely at the evidence.

One study in particular about cocoa staving off cognitive decline jumped out at us because it had sparked a small fracas on PubMed Commons, a site where researchers can comment on published studies. Several researchers took the time to critique everything from the study’s design and statistical analysis to how it was reported in the journal where it was published, Nature Neuroscience.

This Mars-sponsored study, led by researchers from Columbia University, was published in 2014. The researchers had wanted to test whether taking cocoa supplements might enhance a region of the brain called the dentate gyrus that deteriorates with age and is associated with age-related memory loss. They concluded that cocoa supplements — particularly the micronutrients called flavanols in them — can indeed boost cognition in older adults.

The research didn’t come out of a vacuum. Previous studies, particularly those focused on aging in rats, suggested flavanols might prevent cognitive decline. But upon closer examination, it became clear that this particular study was very small and preliminary — and that there were several problems with its design that made its results unreliable. That didn’t stop the chocolate hype machine, though. The paper was trumpeted by the Columbia University press office and large media outlets as more evidence that cocoa and chocolate can fight Alzheimer’s.

Ultimately, the study shows how scientists and the media have seized upon the narrative that chocolate is a health food — even when only the thinnest evidence supports the wishful claim.

The cocoa study was short, small, and focused on narrow outcomes that don’t matter to the real world

Before we dive into what made this Nature Neuroscience study suspicious, let’s look at what it was about. The researchers randomly assigned 37 people to one of four groups for a period of three months:

  1. A group that got a high daily dose (900 mg) of cocoa flavanol supplements as well as one hour of aerobic exercise four times per week
  2. A group that got the same high dose of cocoa flavanol supplements but without the exercise
  3. A control group that got a low dose of cocoa flavanols (10mg) with the one hour of aerobic exercise four times per week
  4. Another control group that got the low cocoa flavanol dose but without the exercise

So basically, the study participants either got a lot of cocoa flavanols or not, and added regular exercise to their lifestyles or not.

The researchers wanted to test whether cocoa flavanol supplements might stave off cognitive decline in the dentate gyrus region of the brain, which is associated with age-related memory loss. They also wanted to see if exercise had any effect on memory, since previous studies had suggested it might.

In the study, they found that exercise had no impact on brain function — but cocoa flavanols did. “Dietary cocoa flavanol consumption enhanced [dentate gyrus] function in the aging human hippocampal circuit,” they concluded. They also made extremely bold statements in the paper, even suggesting that the effects they saw in the high-flavanol group demonstrated that cocoa could reverse age-related memory decline by as many as three decades.

Columbia University’s newsroom touted the research as demonstrating that “dietary flavanols reverse age-related memory decline.” The research was then picked up by media outlets, including the New York Times, which trumpeted chocolate — not just cocoa dietary supplements — as a memory aid.

But here’s the thing: The study never actually proved that cocoa supplements, and especially not chocolate, could prevent memory decline. It was too small, too narrowly focused, and too short-lived to tell us anything important about real memory loss with aging, said Henry Drysdale, a doctor and fellow at Oxford University’s Center for Evidence-Based Medicine.

To track memory decline, the main outcomes the researchers used over a 12-week period were an fMRI test that looked at increases cerebral blood volume, as well as a cognitive function test — the Modified Benton — which was developed at Columbia to measure dentate gyrus function. The researchers who validated the test found that people’s performance on the ModBent worsened with age, so they had reason to believe that this test would be a good marker of whether flavanols could make a difference here.

“Saying if you eat cocoa supplements now you’re going to have better memory in three months is not relevant to real-world [age-related memory decline],” said Drysdale, who co-founded Oxford’s COMPare Trials project which examines the quality of clinical trials.

If you really want to answer that question, you’d run the trial for several years and you’d need a group of study participants that’s bigger than 37 people. Instead of only tracking the study participants’ brain waves in an MRI machine (which is not a measure of cognitive ability), or using an object recognition task (the ModBent) to test memory, you’d also want to measure outcomes that matter in people’s lives, like, whether those taking cocoa could remember what they did that morning or that they had a doctor’s appointment next week better than the people who didn’t take the cocoa, Drysdale added.

This trial only demonstrated that supplements seem to enhance brain function over a period of weeks, and only according to a very specific (and not very widely used) test of cognitive function. That is far from valid proof that cocoa is a memory enhancer.

The researchers did other things that made the results unreliable

Drysdale and other researchers who were not involved with this study also took issue with it for much nerdier reasons. There are problems with how the study was reported that made its results less likely to be reliable — and even less worthy of the hype.

For one thing, the published version of the study looks different from what the researchers originally said they’d set out to do for this trial.

To understand why this matters, let’s step back for a moment.

Before researchers embark on clinical trials, they’re supposed to name (or “pre-specify”) which health outcomes they’re most interested in on a public database, like ClinicalTrials.gov.

For an antidepressant, these might include people’s reports on their mood, or how the drug affects sleep, sexual desire, and even suicidal thoughts. Researchers then group the outcomes into “primary” and “secondary” categories — the primary outcomes being the ones they think are most important — and describe precisely how and when they are going to measure these things.

Scientists are then supposed to broadly stick to this plan when they run their trial, and report on their findings in a journal. If they deviate from their plan, they need to be transparent about it and explain why they did so in the final journal article.

The idea is that researchers won’t just change their plans along the way, or publish positive or more favorable outcomes that turn up during the study, while ignoring or hiding important results that don’t quite materialize as they were hoping. (That’s a sneaky practice called “outcome switching,” and it’s a big problem in science.) Following these steps also enhances the chances that the findings researchers report on are real, not the result of tweaking a study’s design to get splashier conclusions.

But this didn’t happen in the case of this cocoa study.

ClinicalTrials.gov has a handy version control function that lets you see all the changes that were made to a clinical trials registry over time. It shows that the researchers for this cocoa study changed their outcomes over time, and also failed to clearly pre-specify them before starting the trial. They then didn’t report about the changes they made in their final study, which was published in the prestigious journal Nature Neuroscience.

For example, if you look at the earliest version of their ClinicalTrials.gov report, from 2010, the researchers stated that the primary outcome they were interested in was an fMRI test that measures cerebral blood volume. The secondary outcome they were going to look for was “neurocognitive function” — but they didn’t say which test they’d use to measure neurocognitive function. In the published trial, the ModBent appeared as a second primary outcome along with the fMRI.

“If you don’t pre-specify your method of measurement of an outcome — in this case ‘neurocognitive function’ — you are free to choose, consciously or unconsciously, from a range of possible outcomes,” said Drysdale. “You can then pick the outcome that makes your chocolate look good. That’s not to say authors will always do this with vaguely pre-specified outcomes, but the option is there.” In this case, the researchers settled on the ModBent task as their primary outcome (in addition to the fMRI).

I asked the authors on the study why they failed to fully pre-specify their outcomes, and why they didn’t report all the changes they made in their original plan in the final version of the report, like they’re supposed to do. They said they were new to entering clinical trials data on registries, and that they didn’t realize they had to declare changes they had made to their study design in the final study. Whatever the reason, though, these errors in reporting are likely to make their findings less reliable, said Drysdale.

If you look at the most recent version of their clinical trials registry, it was published in January 2015, three months after they published their Nature Neuroscience article. “So they went back after article was published in Nature and changed their clinical trial registry. There is no mention of this in the trial report,” Drysdale added.

To be clear, this cocoa study is not unique. Hype in research is on the rise, and outcome switching is common — as prevalent in industry-sponsored research as it is in independent academic research. But the paper shows how, consciously or unconsciously, studies can be tweaked and exaggerated in ways that can yield misleading conclusions.

“The bigger concern is that people are trying to do a better job of selling the research itself and not just telling what the straight out answer is,” University of Toronto nutrition researcher Richard Bazinet said. This study only showed that over a period of three months, in a small group, according to a very narrow test that taps a very specific region of the brain, cocoa supplements enhanced cognition. That became “chocolate fights Alzheimer’s” — a message Mars surely appreciated.

Source:  vox.com

 

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Cocoa Of Excellence: Celebrating The Farmers Behind Chocolate

November 11th, 2017
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“Without cocoa, there is no chocolate,” says Brigitte Laliberté, the coordinator of the Global Network for Cacao Genetic Resources and the Cocoa of Excellence Programme (CoEx). “It’s as simple as this. Everything starts from there.” She’s right, yet every award honoring chocolate focuses on the end maker, not farmers. The celebrated outlier is the International Cocoa Awards (ICA), an event overseen by Bioversity International, a global research institution headquartered in Rome, Italy, focused on the conservation of biodiversity in food and agriculture. Farmers and the preservation of diverse varieties of crops are central to Bioversity’s mission, including the cocoa that becomes chocolate.

Every two years, CoEx brings together chocolatiers and sensory analysis experts to do blind tastings of processed cocoa samples. This year, the group received 166 samples of cocoa beans from 40 countries ranging from Australia and India to Madagascar and Sierra Leone, part of the equatorial belt where cocoa is grown. Last week in Paris, France, at the Salon du Chocolat, they awarded 18 of those entries with an ICA for their efforts and skill.

The goal of the Awards is to empower farmers by highlighting and celebrating the cocoa supply chain—and the quality and flavors that come from a combination of farmers’ knowledge, genetics, post-harvest processing and the many qualities of terroir, or the taste of place. However, the variety of tantalizing smells and tastes isn’t only about deliciousness. “Cacao diversity,” CoEx explains, “is also vital for production, as it provides not only different flavors, but also resistance to pests and disease outbreaks, and resilience in changing climatic conditions.

In the same vein as the Cup of Excellence awards for coffee, the International Cocoa Awards are also intended to help farmers command a higher price for their crop, which is what they need in order to keep growing cocoa. As Simran Bindra, the cofounder of Tanzania’s Kokoa Kamili (the first East African cocoa company to win an ICA), explains, “We’d spent a lot of time sitting under mango trees with the farmers and asking them: What would be most helpful? Would they be interested in access to loans? Would they be interested in agronomy training? Time and time again, we heard, ‘You know what we’d be interested in? We’d be interested in getting a fair price for our cocoa, for our hard work.’”

This seems basic, but, as previously reported, the majority of cocoa growers are extremely poor. The Cocoa of Excellence Programme strives to alleviate this challenge—and it seems to be working: in the annual evaluation survey, 57% of respondents confirmed that this initiative has helped farmers sell their cocoa at a premium price.

“Just because a farmer only owns a quarter-acre or a half-acre of land in a rural part of a poor country, that doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t be treated equally and fairly with the respect and commitment to ethical business practices that a much larger farmer in a more developed country would receive—or that a customer at a chocolate shop should receive,” Bindra says. “We’re eager to continue our work in making sure Tanzania is recognized as among the best cocoa origins. Hopefully, it will result in more interest from chocolate makers around the world.”

A full list of International Cocoa Award winners can be found here.

Source:  forbes.com

 

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What’s the real cost of chocolate?

November 11th, 2017
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Chocolate is the “food of the gods,” a sweet treat for many across the world, and a booming industry worth an estimated $110 billion a year. But as we unwrap a favorite bar or tuck into a truffle, how many of us take the time to think about where it came from, and who helped in its transformation from the humble cocoa bean?

Most of the world’s cocoa comes from West Africa, with more than a third coming from the Ivory Coast alone. Cocoa is grown mainly on small, family-owned plantations by farmers living in poverty.
By contrast, most of the world’s chocolate is consumed in the wealthy regions of Europe and North America.
Chocolate may be big business, but its key ingredient, cocoa, is cultivated by some of the poorest people on the planet. While demand for cocoa is growing to the point that some experts warn we may run out of affordable supplies within 20 years, the farmers who grow it earn a tiny proportion of the price we pay at the grocery store – and their share has dropped sharply over the past 35 years.
Cocoa beans grow in pods, directly from the trunk of the cocoa tree (Theobroma cacao, or “food of the gods.”) One tree produces between 20 and 30 pods a year, each containing 20 to 50 almond-sized cocoa beans. A year’s harvest from one tree – processed into cocoa liquor, cocoa butter or cocoa powder — is enough to make up to 500g of chocolate.
Source:  cnn.com

 

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From cocoa to chocolate in an entertaining and didactic way

November 11th, 2017
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The children’s vacations are over and the school year has already started. Now, time to study! But before returning to school, many have had the privilege of learning about cocoa and Venezuelan chocolate in an entertaining and didactic way, as it took place at the vacation plan offered by the Chacaomarket in Miranda state.

There, about 18 children in the 5 to 12 age range, from the same neighbourhood and also from other sectors such as Quinta Crespo and La Florida as well as children of some shopkeepers of the market, participated in the activity that was led by the teacher and chocolate entrepreneur Lissett Jiménez.

A transformational process

The subject chosen for this sweet gathering was “From cocoa to chocolate”, in which the youngsters received information about the whole process involved in chocolate making, from the seed to the finished product in its different chocolaty presentations or by-products.

“It was an activityto get to know the history of cocoa, the description of all processes to make chocolate, the different types of the product and the tempering techniques” said Belkys Rodríguez, assistant at the recreation centre. “We also visited the shopkeepers who display their chocolates in the market”.

Rodríguez emphasised that Venezuela possesses one of the best cocoa in the world and that its processing and transformation is so special that she does not hesitate to recommend that cocoa is a subject to be imparted at all Miranda state schools, and beyond.

The Children’s recreation centre at Chacao market is part of a network of municipal recreation centres which are framed in what is known as Chacao Municipio Lector. Two other centres are located in the Library of Los Palos Grandes and in the Bello Campo Park.

Once again, cocoa and Venezuelan chocolate are integrated into the schedule of a vacation programme in the country. Their importance grows, so it does thesense of belonging towards a seed, pride of adults and children.

Source:  vivaelcacao.com

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What’s the Difference Between Cocoa & Cacao?

September 23rd, 2017
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Sure, you love chocolate, but can you tell these ingredients apart?

Most people love the rich, creamy taste of chocolate, but not everyone knows the difference between cocoa and cacao.

The chocolate flavor most of us think of is based on cocoa, which comes from the beans of the cacao tree. Cocoa is processed into cocoa powder, cocoa butter and, of course, chocolate chips. With its sweeter flavor, cocoa is a more common ingredient than cacao in desserts like fudgy brownies and rich chocolate cakes.

The purer form of chocolate is called cacao. It comes from the same source as cocoa, but you can find it in cacao nibs and specialty bars. It’s also a superfood with many antioxidants—in case you needed another reason to give it a try.

Source:  tastingtable.com

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Why chocolate is good for your gut

September 23rd, 2017
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Chocolate lovers, rejoice; the sweet treat is not only delicious, but studies show that it can also promote friendly bacteria and reduce inflammation in our guts.

First, some background: trillions of bacteria live in our guts. They contribute to our immune system, metabolism, and many other processes essential to human health.

When the delicate balance of microbes in our intestines is disturbed, it can have serious consequences.

Irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, autism spectrum disorders, allergies, asthma, and cancer have all been linked to abnormal gut microbiomes.

A healthful diet supports bacterial diversity and health, but could chocolate be an integral part of this?

Benefits of cocoa

Cocoa is the dry, non-fatty component prepared from the seeds of the Theobroma cacao tree and the ingredient that gives chocolate its characteristic taste.

Many health benefits have been attributed to cocoa and its potent antioxidant functions. These include lowering cholesterol, slowing down cognitive decline, and keeping the heart healthy.

Cocoa metabolism is partly dependent on the bacteria that live in our intestines.

Our bodies are only able to absorb some of the nutrients in chocolate. As such, we need our tiny microbial passengers to break complex molecules into smaller components, which we would not be able to take into our bodies otherwise.

This allows us to make full use of the many health-promoting molecules in cocoa. It doesn’t stop there, however. The gut microbes also benefit from this relationship, which, in turn, has an even greater effect on our health.

Gut health and inflammation

Several studies show that the consumption of cocoa increases the levels of so-called friendly bacteria in the gut.

Researchers from the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom measured higher levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in the intestines of human volunteers who drank high-cocoa chocolate milk for 4 weeks.

The same team previously showed that components in cocoa can reduce the growth of Clostridium histolyticum bacteria, which are present in the guts of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease.

In pigs, higher levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species were also found in the colon in response to a high-cocoa diet. Interestingly, the expression of known inflammatory markers was reduced.

Friendly bacteria including Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium have, in fact, been implicated in actively promoting anti-inflammatory processes in our intestines, keeping our gut healthy.

Chocolate as part of a healthful diet

Despite the fact that these scientific studies support the claim that cocoa can be beneficial for our gut microbiomes, cocoa does not equal chocolate.

The cocoa extracts used in research do not contain the high levels of sugar and fat found in our everyday chocolate bars.

Unsweetened cocoa powder or high-cocoa content dark chocolate are the closest alternatives to the cocoa used in these studies. Consumed in moderation, chocolate may therefore promote friendly bacteria, and, by extension, a healthy gut, keeping inflammation at bay.

When choosing your next chocolate treat, join the Medical News Today editorial team in their choice and opt for a nice piece of dark chocolate.

Source:  medicalnewstoday.com

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Scientists debut first new chocolate in 80 years and it’s pink!

September 11th, 2017
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We’d like to think that chocolate science has become a perfected art over the last century or so.

But scientists would disagree, particularly the chocolate scientists over at Swiss company Barry Callebaut, who have recently debuted the first new kind of natural chocolate in over 80 years.

Hold on to your hats, millennial pink lovers. Now, along with dark, milk and white chocolate, please welcome … ruby chocolate!

The rosy pink-colored chocolate comes from the Ruby cocoa bean, and was launched at a special event in Shanghai on Tuesday. Not only does the chocolate look wildly different, but it also has a unique, fruitier taste.

“The fourth type [of] chocolate offers a totally new taste experience, which is not bitter, milky or sweet, but a tension between berry fruitiness and luscious smoothness,” the company said in a news release. “To create Ruby chocolate, no berries or berry flavor, nor color, is added.”

As a company spokesperson told TODAY via email, the Ruby bean grows in countries like Ecuador, Brazil and the Ivory Coast, “but you need the right” bean for it. Barry Callebaut “is able to identify the specific Ruby beans. Secondly, we developed a unique processing that makes those special precursors come alive, creating Ruby chocolate.”

There are no additives to the chocolate, added the spokesperson.

Believe it or not, white chocolate was actually the last kind of chocolate to be launched, by Nestle, in the 1930s. That said, white chocolate is actually a chocolate derivative since it contains no cocoa solids, and has specific standards that have to be adhered to in order to be called white. Ruby chocolate is, says the spokesperson, a “real chocolate” and not a derivative.

Other companies have created red cocoa powder in recent years, but as Barry Callebaut notes, this is the first time “natural reddish chocolate” has been produced.

Source: today.com

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A study of the Indo-China chocolate market 2017

August 12th, 2017
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The global demand for chocolate is now showing recovery and leading suppliers such as Barry Callebaut are now forecasting stabilization of demand in the key markets worldwide. By 2020, the United States is expected to be the largest consumer of chocolate globally, followed by Russia. Amongst the BRIC nations, while India and China are nations projected to have the highest chocolate market growth in the period 2015-2020, economic conditions in Brazil and Russia have been hampering the chocolate market’s growth.

It is expected that the global chocolate market will grow at a CAGR of approximately to 5% through 2020. New flavours coupled with product packaging innovations will be the trend going forward. World over there is growth potential in the customized and luxury chocolate segments. People have a rising affinity for handcrafted chocolate and many startups are dappling in the art of chocolate making. Popularity of premium chocolates is on the rise particularly in the United States and Brazil. While rising obesity and health concerns world wide is a challenge for the growth of the sector, there is also growing awareness about the benefits of dark chocolate. Players have also been introducing low sugar and sugarless chocolates.

Globally, India is amongst the fastest growing chocolate markets. In 2016, the chocolate market in the country grew by 13% year-on-year. Other than India, Poland’s market which grew at 2% year-on-year are the only two countries globally to have shown growth in the chocolate market. India is amongst the four countries projected to have the highest chocolate market growth in the period 2015-2020. Other countries include Mexico, China and Brazil. The chocolate market in India is currently growing at a rate of 20% annually and is projected to grow by 30% by 2020.

In 2014 the per capita consumption of chocolate in China was just 0.2 kgs as compared with 2.5 kgs per person in Brazil, 0.7 kgs per person in India and 2.2 kgs in United States. Hence, a huge untapped potential exists in the market. However, the recent government corruption crackdown has dampened the chocolate market in China.

A challenge facing the market is that Chinese customers do not trust home grown brands due to food safety issues. They have a greater affinity for foreign chocolate brands, close to 70% of the Chinese chocolate market is controlled by European brands. Other than the food safety concern, the poor performance of local chocolate brands can be attributed primarily to poor marketing efforts.

The report ‘A Study of the Indo-China Chocolate Market 2017’ highlights key dynamics ofthe global, India and China’schocolate market. The potential of the sector has been investigated along with the emerging trends.The current market scenario and future prospects of the sector has also been studied. The report contains profiles of key players including Nestle S.A., Mars Foods, Ferrero Rocher, The Hershey Company, Mondelez International Inc., Amul. The report contains latest opinions of industry experts.

Source: Asia Food Journal

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Report: Chocolate markets in India, China expected to see greatest growth

July 29th, 2017
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The Indian and Chinese chocolate markets are among those expected to see the most growth over the next few years, research shows.
In “Indo-China Chocolate Market Study 2017,” India-based Smart Research Insights projects the global chocolate market to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 5 percent through 2020, thanks to innovations in flavors and packaging.
“World over there is growth potential in the customized and luxury segments,” the report’s executive summary reads. “People have a rising affinity for handcrafted chocolate, and many startups are dabbling in the art of chocolate making.”
The United States is expected to be the largest consumer of chocolate globally, followed by Russia. However, India’s chocolate market — which experienced 13 percent year-on-year growth in 2016 — is projected to grow by 30 percent by 2020.
Smart Research Insights said nearly 70 percent of India’s chocolate consumption occurs in urban areas, thanks to poor infrastructure, lack of cold storage facilities and greater affinity for traditional Indian sweets in rural areas. However, consumption of chocolate in small packages priced between 5 and 10 Indian rupees, is expanding in rural parts of the county.
The research firm also pointed to potential in China’s chocolate market, noting the country’s per capita consumption was about a tenth of that in Brazil and the United States in 2014. Chinese chocolate brands could also stand to have a greater presence, since 70 percent of the market is controlled by European brands.
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