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2ab Wheat for gut-friendly bakery products

October 7th, 2017
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GoodMills Innovation presents an ancient wheat alternative to common bread wheat

At FiE 2017, GoodMills Innovation will introduce its new product 2ab Wheat, an ancient grain that is very well tolerated. This grain innovation is easy to process and allows both artisan and industrial bakers to produce wholesome bakery products with a convincing texture and taste. Thus, 2ab Wheat is a real alternative to modern bread wheat as well as to well-known ancient grains such as einkorn or emmer, which score neither with their sensory properties nor technologically when processed on their own. At its FiE booth, GoodMills Innovation will explain all about the properties and nutritional background of 2ab Weat. In addition, trade fair visitors will be able to taste a broad variety of 2ab baked goods made from 2ab Wheat.

Thanks to its excellent baking properties, 2ab Wheat flour is ideal for artisan bakers as well as for industrial production. Baked goods are well tolerated, even by food-sensitive eaters, and convince with a full-bodied taste and a soft, lush golden crumb. Michael Gusko, Managing Director at GoodMills Innovation, says: “For me, 2ab Wheat is the wheat of the future. Bakers now have a tasty solution for customers who react sensitive to wheat or who prefer original grain varieties. We are in the process of introducing 2ab Wheat into the market, and initial feedback from bakers has been consistently positive. Having discovered an easy to digest, delectable bread for themselves, customers are staying loyal to ‘their’ bakers.”

With increasing numbers of consumers turning away from modern bread wheat either for health reasons or because they prefer traditional products of well-known origin, GoodMills Innovation collaborated with scientists, grain breeders and nutritionists and selected the ancient 2ab wheat variety from hundreds of alternatives. Wheat-sensitive consumers and modern wheat critics had previously avoided wheat-containing baked goods or chose gluten-free options – often with significant drawbacks in terms of taste and texture.

More information about 2ab Wheat, with simple explanations and a shop finder for consumers as well as studies and background information for health professionals, can be found at www.2ad-wheat.com .

About GoodMills Innovation GmbH

GoodMills Innovation GmbH has its headquarters in Hamburg, Germany, and is a joint venture between Europe’s leading milling enterprise, the GoodMills Group, and the global ingredients manufacturer Palsgaard A/S, which is based in Denmark. Together with its Polish subsidiary GoodMills Innovation Polska Sp z o.o, the company employs a staff of 120 in Europe.

Sound grain expertise and state-of-the-art refining technologies are the foundations of the company, which operates worldwide. Innovative and natural products that combine functionality and taste with health benefits have been developed in close cooperation with experts from science and industry. Customers from the food industry and the bakery trade benefit from tailor-made products as well as competent advice on application, food legislation and marketing issues.

Source: Ingredients Network

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Ingredients, Milling industry ,

Gelato to go and coffee around the clock

October 7th, 2017
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A new generation of ice cream makers are revolutionising the ice cream parlour

Though gelato is ever popular, traditional ice cream parlours are going out of fashion.
More than 90 % of gelato consumed in Germany is now industrially produced and in some cases boosted on the market by major advertising campaigns. Nevertheless, small ice cream parlours, some with only a few varieties, but freshly made from high quality natural ingredients, without colouring, additives or flavourings, are increasing their hold on the market. From 3 to 7 February 2018 the Gelatissimo trade fair in Stuttgart lets you gain a full picture of developments in the artisan ice cream business in recent years. The brand new 15,000 m² Paul Horn Hall (Hall 10) offers more space than ever before for ice cream.
Gelatissimo previews new trends set to change the gelato world – new favourites and original ice cream parlour interior designs. The ice cream parlour itself is in the midst of change, with the latest newcomer business concepts focusing on vintage style and take-aways offering only one ice cream to go and high quality coffee specialities, and enjoying increasing popularity in the process.

Small, but delish – the ice cream take-away

The longer season and rising overheads have resulted in a mushrooming of small ice cream parlours distinguished by artisan quality and creativity. Ice in a wafer or tub, classics like brittle nut sundaes, spaghetti ice cream or amarena cherry sundaes to go are the bestsellers in small ice cream parlours. No terrace with lots of waited-on tables, but an emphasis on cutting costs, smaller premises and self-service. Alongside this purist style, ice cream parlours are becoming increasingly original and the selection more unusual: exotic ice cream varieties, exclusive sorbets and the ice cream parlour’s own creations which depart from the norm. Ice cream lovers are tempted by unique varieties made of natural ingredients and complemented by decorative sauces to create perfectly balanced compositions: ice cream varieties with a savoury flavour, creations inspired by the cake making, exotic versions and fruit sorbets with local fruit are increasingly listed on the menu card. They are the ice cream parlour’s highlights, complementing the standard flavours. Traditional ice-cream sundaes are no longer served at the table either, but sold in stylish transparent bio-degradable containers as take-aways.

Ice cream & coffee: a successful duo

Italian-style coffee, cappuccino or espresso, has always been a standard in classic Italian ice cream parlours. In Germany a modern coffee culture has developed in recent years, resulting in a much wider selection. From latte macchiato or white coffee and American-style filter coffee to the latest trends like cold brew, the classic coffee shop repertoire is now also available in the ice cream parlour. And Italian flair is back in vogue, whether chatting over the counter with the barista, or in a take-away version for people with no time to linger. Against this current backdrop, Messe Stuttgart has set the tone with the “Stuttgart Coffee Summit” which coincides with the Gelatissimo trade fair and is being held for the 4th time already. The programme is packed with workshops, highlights, get-togethers and opportunities for professionals and interested visitors to mingle and exchange ideas. A lot of emphasis is placed on the Coffee Summit motto focusing on the coffee life cycle “from bean to cup”. All processing phases, from sorting and harvesting to roasting and grinding using innovative practical and elegant technology, is presented at the event. In Alfred Kärcher Hall (Hall 8) visitors await an outstanding coffee presentation thanks to the many exhibitors and programme events.

3rd edition of the Grand Prix
Ice cream makers keen to test their skill against the best in their trade in the Gelatissimo ice arena can register for the Grand Prix. This competition involves the preparation of three different ice cream varieties. This year creative interpretations of the following flavours are sought: Day 1 yoghurt, Day 2 raspberry and Day 3 a fantasy flavour. Each winner of the daily competition receives a wonderful Vespa as a prize. On Day 4 the winners compete against each other in a bid to make the best pistachio ice cream. A jury of five experts will track the creative process and then select the best pistachio ice cream. The entire Grand Prix will be broadcast with a live audience. For more details about the Gelatissimo Grand Prix and registration forms go to www.gelatissimo.de/grandprix.

About Gelatissimo:
Gelatissimo, the largest ice cream trade fair north of the Alps, aims to present the world of ice cream culture in all its diversity. Founded in 2008 it takes place every two years and is the German meeting place for artisan ice cream makers. Coinciding with Intergastra – one of the key European hospitality and hotel trade fairs and dedicated host – in 2016 the range of products exhibited in an area covering more than 100,000 square metres attracted around 1,300 exhibitors from home and abroad. And the next chapter of the success story is about to unfold: with the building of the new Paul Horn Hall (Hall 10) and 115,000 square metres at their disposal, as of 2018 the two trade fairs are now offered even more space for innovations and trends. The event therefore meets these high expectations, and regularly receives top marks from the exhibiting companies and specialist visitors alike. Handmade ice cream, coffee, beverages, kitchen technology and food, ambience, equipment and services – these are the themes on which the specialist visitors from Germany and abroad obtain information, and are encouraged to think outside the box. The gastronomic heart of Germany beats in the south-west where at the start of the year Gelatissimo and Intergastra showcase innovations and trends, and provide many opportunities for the exchange of expert opinions and ideas. For more details go to www.gelatissimo.de

 

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3D Printing Comes to the Baking Industry

October 7th, 2017
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Three-dimensional printing for the pastry, cake decorating and baking industries has arrived.

CSM Bakery Solutions and 3D Systems Corporation, the originator of 3D printing and solutions, have announced they have reached an agreement to collaborate in the development, sale and distribution of 3D printers, products and materials for the bakery and food industry.

The global agreement allows the two industry leaders to join forces to bring innovative and creative 3D printed culinary products to the market. CSM will support the development of and have exclusive rights to utilize 3D Systems’ ChefJet Pro 3D printer for high-resolution, colorful food products for the professional culinary environment.

“We are very excited about what this opportunity can mean for the food industry,” says Marianne Kirkegaard, CSM’s president and chief executive officer.

The partnership enables collaborative research and development, engineering, design and printer development that will be focused on specific sourcing, food product development and go-to-market plans. After careful analysis and extensive discussions, planning, and market research, CSM and 3D Systems have formalized this agreement and are beginning the work to bring prototypes to the market.

“Our agreement with 3D Systems has the potential to re-shape the food industry,” Kirkegaard says. “Across a number of industries, 3D printing has helped transform industries and there’s every reason to think the same can be true for the food industry. We are excited to partner and continue to expand capabilities and culinary opportunities with their platform.”

Vyomesh Joshi, 3D Systems president and chief executive officer, expresses similar optimism about the agreement.

“Our extensive and versatile portfolio of materials addresses the widest range of applications and performance in 3D printing – from culinary to industrial,” he says. “As we continue to drive innovation and explore strategic partnerships with industry leaders, our partnership with CSM is a perfect fit to leverage our technology and capabilities to expand applications and materials.”

Showcased at the National Restaurant Association Show 2015 in Chicago, the ChefJet Pro from 3D Systems can create full-color bespoke confections for an unlimited array of applications, such as sculptural, ornate cake and cupcake toppers, candies, delicate latticework or logo sugar cubes.

Speaking at the 2015 NRA Show, Tom Vaccaro, dean of Baking and Pastry Arts at the Culinary Institute of America, posed a question to the audience: “What will cakes look like in the future? With this technology, they can really take any shape. In a lot of ways, this technology touches the creativity of the chef and also your guests. You could pretty much say to your guests: Tell me your dreams.”

Source: bakemag.com

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Pastry, Technology ,

Fat replacers market estimated to be worth US$2.01 billion by 2022

October 7th, 2017
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New research shows that the fat replacers market is becoming an increasingly profitable one as consumers become increasingly health-conscious.

New research from MarketsandMarkets™ has revealed that the fat replacers market is estimated to be worth US$1.48 Billion in 2017, and is projected to reach USD 2.01 Billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 6.2% from 2017. Major factors driving this increase are the increasing consumer awareness about health & wellness, and the rise in prevalence of obesity.

The protein-based fat replacers segment is projected to be the fastest-growing in this market. Already, protein consumption is growing in demand for health and aesthetic purposes, and the demand for food products with high-protein but low-fat content is expected to contribute significantly to the growth of the protein-based fat replacers market.

The bakery & confectionery products segment has so far accounted for the largest share in the fat replacers market. Consumers in developed regions such as North America and Europe have become increasingly conscious about leading a healthy lifestyle, leading to a demand for the reduction of fat content in bakery & confectionery products. Products such as cakes and pastries increasingly require fat replacers for consumers who demand low-fat and low-calorie options. This trend has led to considerable market opportunities for bakery & confectionery products segment during the forecast period.

In terms of growth though, the liquid segment is projected to be the fastest-growing in the market. The rise in demand for convenience foods is likely to drive the market for liquid fat replacers as they are used to replace fatty oils, thereby contributing significantly. They also provide a glossy texture and help prevent stickiness on confectionery products.

Additionally, Asia Pacific is projected to be the fastest-growing region in this area due to its growing economy. Various factors such as rapid urbanization, changes in lifestyle, and increase in demand for convenience products are driving the growth of the food & beverages sector. China especially has witnessed rapid growth in this market due to concerns about the adverse effects of fats and calories, and a growth in consumer awareness regarding the maintenance of a healthy diet. The high consumption of convenience foods in countries such as India, China, and Malaysia is expected to drive the demand for fat replacers in these regions.

Currently, key players in the fat replacer market include ADM (USA), DuPont (USA), Cargill (USA), Kerry Group (Ireland), FMC Corporation (USA), Ashland Inc (USA), Ingredion (USA), and Koninklijke DSM (Netherlands).

Source: Asia Food Journal

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Health, Ingredients

FAO Food Price Index mildly up in September

October 7th, 2017
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» The FAO Food Price Index* (FFPI) averaged 178.4 points in September 2017, up 1.4 points (0.8 percent) from August and 7.4 points (4.3 percent) above September 2016. Firmer prices in the vegetable oil and dairy sectors were behind the small month-on-month rise in the value of the FFPI.

» The FAO Cereal Price Index averaged 152.2 points in September, down 1.6 points (1.0 percent) from August. While the Index declined for the second consecutive month, it remained 8 percent above the corresponding month last year. Maize prices fell in September, reacting to ample supplies in South America and harvest pressure in the northern hemisphere. Wheat values were also weaker, with continued upgrading of this year’s harvest in the Russian Federation a major factor. By contrast, seasonally tight availabilities of fragrant rice and firm demand for higher quality Indica supplies kept international rice prices firm over the month.

» The FAO Vegetable Oil Price Index averaged 171.9 points in September, compared to 164.4 in August – rising for the second consecutive month and marking a 7-month high. The gain was primarily driven by palm oil, prices of which strengthened amid lower than anticipated production in Southeast Asia and firm import demand fuelled by low inventory levels in main importing countries. International soy oil prices also rose, mainly reflecting concerns about a slow start in plantings in South America, though the price increases were capped by larger than expected harvest estimates in the United States. Continued firmness in rapeseed and sunflower oil values also contributed to the rise in the index.

» The FAO Dairy Price Index averaged 224.2 points in September, up 4.5 points (2.1 percent) from the previous month. At this level, the index was 27.4 percent higher than the corresponding period last year, but still 18.6 percent below its peak reached in February 2014. The increase in September reflects continued supply constraints in Australia, New Zealand and the European Union, with growth in the United States remaining timid. Butter and cheese remain the dairy products in highest demand, especially in Asia. Meanwhile, international prices of Skimmed Milk Powder (SMP) and Whole Milk Powder (WMP) fell due to limited buying interests.

» The FAO Meat Price Index* averaged 173.2 points in September, unchanged from August but up 9.5 points (5.8 percent) compared to the same period last year. In September, a rise in the international prices of ovine meat countered a decline in pig meat quotations, while those of bovine and poultry meat remained largely unchanged. In the case of ovine meat, prices rose, buoyed by strong import demand, especially from the Middle East and South East Asia, coupled with continued overall supply constraints in Oceania. By contrast, pigmeat prices fell slightly, responding to improved supplies from Brazil. Poultry and bovine meat markets remained well supplied, keeping prices stable.

» The FAO Sugar Price Index averaged 204.2 points in September, nearly unchanged from August but as much as 101 points (33 percent) below the same period last year.  The rapid decline in sugar quotations since the beginning of this year reflects a continuing oversupply situation prevailing in world markets, in parallel with the slow-down in demand.

* Unlike for other commodity groups, most prices utilized in the calculation of the FAO Meat Price Index are not available when the FAO Food Price Index is computed and published; therefore, the value of the Meat Price Index for the most recent months is derived from a mixture of projected and observed prices. This can, at times, require significant revisions in the final value of the FAO Meat Price Index which could in turn influence the value of the FAO Food Price Index.

Download full dataset: Excel, CSV

Download full dataset: Excel

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Commodities

Global Cookies Market Will Reach 38 Billion USD by 2022

October 7th, 2017
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A The global cookies market has come into the limelight in recent years as a result of flavour, taste, shape, and packaging innovations mainly driven by health and safety concerns from both regulatory authorities as well as consumers. Cookies are typically eaten as an anytime snack and were initially viewed as an indulgence. Today, a number of companies have cookies with ingredients such as oatmeal that are actively marketed towards health-conscious individuals. The cookies market is estimated to witness a robust CAGR of 5.8 percent from 2017 to 2022 – says Persistence Market Research in a new report.

Modern trade accounts for roughly a third of the revenue share in the cookies market by sales channel segment in 2017. Modern trade segment is projected to be worth more than 12 billion USD by end 2022, making it critical for stakeholders in the cookies market to effectively exploit this sales channel segment. The rapid economic growth observed in the APeJ region – Asia-Pacific excluding Japan – should certainly benefit the APeJ modern trade channels and companies are recommended to devise their strategies accordingly. Traditional grocery stores are half the size of modern trade in terms of revenue share and are unlikely to outpace the latter anytime soon in the cookies market. Although APeJ is the largest regional contributor in the traditional grocery store segment, Latin America is predicted to record a much higher CAGR for the period studied.

Convenience stores are a relative minnow in the cookies market as this segment has a revenue share in single digits. Nonetheless, the APeJ convenience store segment is on track to move past 400 million USD by the end of 2022, making it unwise to overlook this sales channel entirely in favour of either modern trade or grocery stores in the cookies market. As Internet infrastructure improves, particularly in Latin America and APeJ, ecommerce should become a much preferred option for many consumers because of its numerous advantages. The online channel segment has the maximum growth potential in APeJ as millions of individuals using the Internet for the first time in this dynamic continent and can easily by tapped by cookie makers that focus their attention on online marketing

Oatmeal has a revenue share of slightly over a sixth of the cookies market by ingredient and is likely to gain share over the next five years. Oatmeal is considerably healthier than either chocolate cookies or chocolate chip cookies and can be marketed extensively to customers as a tasty yet healthy option. A robust CAGR of more than six percent for the period from 2017 to 2022 makes the prospects of the oatmeal segment very bright indeed in the cookies market. It remains to be seen if they can outpace the perennial forerunner in the cookies market – chocolate cookies.

Source: bakenet:eu

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Bakery ,

How barcodes can help fight food fraud

October 7th, 2017
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Food ranks among the top five most valuable counterfeit markets

While it’s well-known by professionals in the food industry, many consumers are surprised to find out that food ranks in the top five most valuable counterfeit markets.

Fake food is such a problem worldwide that the growth of the global anti-counterfeiting market will outpace the overall market segment growth of the food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries by roughly two to three times in the next five years, according to the Brand Protection and Product Traceability Market Research Report from PMMI, The Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies.

And, North America alone will account for nearly half of the total growth in the global anti-counterfeit food packaging market.

The entire food supply chain requires new measures of safety to close the gaps when tracking, authenticating and locating products. These solutions will go far beyond the idea of a simple fix, creating added layers of supply chain security.

Within the layered approach to brand protection are overt technologies — barcodes, holograms, watermarks, embossing and etching — and covert technologies — taggants, UV, infrared and fluorescent inks, Smart technology and radio frequency identification (RFID).

While new technologies are in research and development, 1D barcodes continue to anchor track and trace technology.

The traditional 1D barcodes are used most often by three out of four companies for tracking incoming product from the source through delivery at the food manufacturing facility, to packaging. All the goods come in dated with lot codes that are scanned upon plant entry, throughout all internal phases and back out into the supply chain.

There will always be a need for human readable dates and markings. And consumers need to be able to easily read information on the label for so they know if the product they have is genuine.

The traditional 1D barcodes are used most often by three out of four companies for tracking incoming product from the source through delivery at the food manufacturing facility, to packaging.

All the goods come in dated with lot codes that are scanned upon plant entry, throughout all internal phases and back out into the supply chain.

However, while 1D barcodes remain dominant, 2D barcode usage growing is growing via QR codes that can hold pictures, videos and more. Three-dimensional codes are emerging but only offer a colored pattern 2D barcode. Smaller or even invisible barcode technology will expand as the push toward “uncluttered packaging” encourages clean-labeling, clear packaging and imperceptible embedded codes.

While smart labels/tags are growing in retail and inventory tracking, the perishable goods segment—like food—projects to grow at the highest rate (especially labels).

Learn more at PMMI.org

Source:  foodengineeringmag.com

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Packaging

Bringing sweets from dreams to reality at PACK EXPO

October 7th, 2017
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Exhibit held Sept. 25-27 at the Las Vegas Convention Center reflects continued growth in packaging sector.

Writing this column was not as easy as I hoped it would be.
Several of my BNP Media colleagues and I attended PACK EXPO, staged by PMMI at the Las Vegas Convention Center last week. More than 2,000 exhibitors displayed their processing and packaging capabilities and equipment for thousands of attendees from across the globe — attendees who undoubtedly hit the Strip to blow off steam after long days at the show.
Not surprisingly, I came back with a mountain of information to share, which I still plan to do. But as I write this, Las Vegas is reeling. Nearly 60 people are dead and more than 500 others were injured after a gunman on Sunday open fired at a musical festival from the 32nd floor of Mandalay Bay.
It’s hard to believe when a tragedy like this strikes, but this one was particularly jarring, knowing the BNP folks and thousands of other PACK EXPO attendees were in Vegas four or five days before the shooting. We were lucky, but sadly, many others weren’t.
My thoughts are with the victims, survivors and their families as they and Las Vegas pick up the pieces in the coming weeks. But, as we mourn and determine our next steps as a nation, we’ll soldier on. In that spirit, here’s more on PACK EXPO.
*****
The U.S. packaging machinery market continues to grow, according to PMMI’s 2017 State of the Industry report.
Presenting the data at a media breakfast the first day of PACK EXPO, Jorge Izquierdo, PMMI v.p. of market development, said the market was expected to hit $9.8 billion in 2016, up 4.8 percent from 2015.
Domestic shipments of packaging machinery rose by 2.9 percent to $7.7 billion in 2016, while equipment exports dropped by 8.5 percent. Packaging equipment imports, however, grew by 12.7 percent, which Izquierdo attributed to a strong exchange rate. He said imports are expected to grow over the next few years, but the growth rate will likely slow.
The pharmaceuticals sector is forecast to grow the fastest of all sectors over the next five years, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.6 percent. The food industry, which includes nutraceuticals, won’t be far behind, with a projected CAGR of 2.3 percent.
Izquierdo attributed the investment in food packaging to an “explosion of SKUs,” noting manufacturers often experience multiple changeovers a day.
“It completely changes how manufacturers produce those products,” he said.
More products and tighter schedules mean manufacturers need greater efficiency and flexibility. Bosch Packaging Technology hopes to deliver that with the Continline bar production system, currently in use by Toronto-based Riverside Natural Foods.
“Handling bars is a challenge,” said Bosch’s Josua Schwab, noting the material is often sticky and may contain allergens. The Contiline system — which features the WRF 600 Flex roller former, allowing for different bar widths — also offers toolless format changes and a hygienic design.
“The Bosch bar production and packaging system offers easy operation and cleaning as well as the right level of automation and format flexibility,” says Klaus Haebig, Bosch North American sales manager.
Sollich showed the Thermo-Flow 1050 KK cooling tunnel with PU-Covers in Gullwing design. The tunnel frame and base are made of stainless steel, while the Gullwing covers are manufactured from lightweight composite material. The tunnel, designed to reduce potential bacterial growth, can be easily wiped down.
Also on display was the Enromat M6 1050 CIP enrober, which features an automatic washing system for easy changeover cleaning, said Sollich North America’s Sean Burns.
“It’s very easy to clean and easy to verify that it’s clean,” he said.
Schubert North America, meanwhile, showed the Flowmodul, the new flow-wrapping component of its TLM line for the first time in the U.S. Five F4 robots placed biscuits into the Flowmodul’s product feeding system, which were then sealed into flowpacks.
Schubert also demonstrated its GRIPS.world web-based platform, which allows for monitoring and documentation of machine data in a single-user interface. Collecting data in real time can help manufacturers predict equipment malfunctions and plan for downtime, Schubert’s Armin Klotz said.
Most of my experience over the last year has been with finished confections, so it was wonderful to get more exposure to the processing and packaging sides of the industry. I’m looking forward to learning more about the machines that bring our favorite sweets from dreams to reality.
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Packaging ,

Barry Callebaut continues to expand in North America

October 7th, 2017
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Barry Callebaut completes investments in two manufacturing facilities and introduces new warehouse

The Barry Callebaut Group, the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality chocolate and cocoa products, today announced it has completed two expansion projects in the US. Factories located in American Canyon, California and Chicago, Illinois recently received significant investment totaling nearly $25 million, which is within the annual CAPEX budget. Commencement of the American Canyon facility investment was announced in November of 2016. In addition, Barry Callebaut has opened a new warehouse in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. This new warehouse consolidates previous distribution operations and integrates many technological advancements.

“These investments in manufacturing and warehousing demonstrate Barry Callebaut’s continued focus on service and product availability to meet our customers’ needs. As our customer base grows, we continue to invest in infrastructure to support that progress”, says Peter Boone, President, Americas Region.

Recent expansion in the American Canyon, CA factory includes an additional molding line, an additional liquid line, and several other equipment improvements. These investments allow Barry Callebaut to continue its growth among clientele on the West Coast. In its Chicago, IL facility, Barry Callebaut has added a molding line and related infrastructure. This investment in Chicago provides Barry Callebaut the capacity to enhance service levels for Midwest region customers.

Barry Callebaut has also opened a new warehouse in Bethlehem, PA, completely managed in-house. The Bethlehem warehouse includes over 500,000 square feet of temperature-controlled space and will function as the company’s main distribution hub for its business on the East Coast.

 

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