US FDA proposes changes in packaged foods labeling

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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed labeling changes to add the percentage of recommended daily intake of added sugars in packaged foods.

In March last year, FDA proposed that food companies include added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label. However, this proposed rule did not include the declaration of the percent daily value for added sugars.

The current proposal requires labels to feature the percent daily value for total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrate, dietary fiber, calcium and iron.

The FDA is also proposing to change the current footnote on the Nutrition Facts label and make it shorter to allow for more space on the label, stating: *The percent daily value (%DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an independent advisory committee, recommended daily intake of calories from added sugars should not exceed 10% of total calories.

FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition director Susan Mayne said: “The FDA has a responsibility to give consumers the information they need to make informed dietary decisions for themselves and their families.

“For the past decade, consumers have been advised to reduce their intake of added sugars, and the proposed percent daily value for added sugars on the Nutrition Facts label is intended to help consumers follow that advice.”

Several studies found that lower amounts of sugar-sweetened foods and beverages reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. The added sugars in foods and beverages add calories without providing additional nutrients.

Proposals are invited from the public for up to 75 days.

Source: food-business-review.com

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